Banks far from hitting Paris targets

Worldwide study by investors group pleads for action

This article was written by Ed Davey and was published in the Toronto Star on July 29, 2022.

The efforts of giant banks to align their policies with global warming of no more than 1.5 C are falling short, says a study by the Institutional Investors Group on Climate Change.

The world’s most influential banks need to substantially accelerate climate efforts if global temperature rise is to be kept within the targets of the Paris Agreement, an assessment released Thursday by an institutional investors group warned.

The efforts of 27 giant banks in North America, Europe and Asia to align their policies with global warming of no more than 1.5 C are falling far short in every area measured in the pilot study, obtained exclusively by The Associated Press. The report said no major bank has committed to end financing for new oil and gas exploration, and only one has promised to cut all coal financing in line with International Energy Agency guidelines.

The evaluation was prepared by the Institutional Investors Group on Climate Change (IIGCC), whose more than 350 members are mainly asset managers and owners. They include Barclay’s Bank UK Retirement Fund, BlackRock and Goldman Sachs Asset Management International. Group members have $52 trillion (U.S) in assets under management and advice, according to the IIGCC website. That amounts to roughly a tenth of total assets held by financial institutions worldwide. The Transition Pathway Initiative, a research group that tracks corporate emissions, was a co-author of the report.

The evaluation is significant because it comes from within the financial community, echoing the idea that fossil fuel investments must wind down, which environmentalists, scientists and energy experts have argued for years.

Witold Henisz, vice dean of the environmental, social and governance initiative at the Wharton Business School, said the study “establishes convincingly that banks are not yet demonstrating substantive progress toward net zero, and often even their own commitments.” A growing body of research suggests low public rankings shame companies into responding, he said — and investors may punish them.

Any quibbles over methodology “will not alter the above high-level conclusion,” he added.

The study assessed banks for six areas where they should be showing progress if their lending and other services were aligned with a sharp ramp down of emissions: the strength of net zero pledges; shortand medium-term emissions targets; decarbonization strategies, namely, plans for exiting polluting industries; lobbying on climate regulation; how climate risk is reflected in accounts and audits, and governance, meaning how climate risks are incorporated into leadership structures.

Evaluators set benchmarks for each area. Banks were graded on how many they hit. A 100% rating would mean a bank was completely aligned with the Paris goals in that category.

As gatekeepers of the world’s money, banks play a critical role in climate change, the study said. They make new fossil fuel projects possible via financing. They decide whether to lend money for coal mines and for agribusinesses that fell tropical rainforest. There are other sources of finance, and private equity in particular has a growing role, but banks remain the most important.

Two-thirds of banks have committed to achieving net zero carbon emissions, the study found, but these commitments “vary widely.” Only UBS commits to net zero over its entire business, the study found.

The four Chinese banks in the report, Agricultural Bank of China, Bank of China, China Construction Bank and the Industrial and Commercial Bank of China, have made no commitment to net zero emissions, the study found. They were the worst-rated institutions, each scoring zero in five of the six categories assessed.

The AP sought comment from these banks on several occasions, but none responded.

Each year, a body known as the Financial Stability Board, based in Basel, Switzerland and created by the Group of 20 heads of major economies, gauges which banks in the world are most influential based on their size and importance to the global financial system. The world’s four most influential banks in 2021 — JPMorgan Chase, BNP Paribas, Citigroup and HSBC — each were assessed at zero in two or three areas in the evaluation. Climate governance was the only category where all were judged to be making substantial progress.

By email, Citigroup and JPMorgan both declined to comment. Both banks published targets to align the company’s practices with the Paris goal in spring 2021.

In a statement, BNP Paribas said it has made new climate commitments, including a 25 per cent reduction in oil financing, since Feb. 25, the last date included in the research.

The bank reasserted its commitment to achieving a carbon-neutral economy by 2050 and limiting global warming to 1.5 C. BNP Paribas has implemented “pioneering policies” to protect the climate and biodiversity, especially in forests, it said. It will “progressively reduce its exposure” to companies that won’t decarbonize fast enough.

Scientists say emissions must sharply ramp down in the short and medium term, so benchmarks for 2030 and 2035 are crucial.

The evaluation is significant because it comes from within the financial community, echoing the idea that fossil fuel investments must wind down

Author: Ray Nakano

Ray is a retired, third generation Japanese Canadian born and raised in Hamilton, Ontario along with his 4 younger sisters. He resides in Toronto where he worked for the Ontario Government for 28 years. Ray currently practises in 2 Buddhist traditions: Jodo Shinshu and that of Thich Nhat Hanh. Ray is passionate about climate action and very concerned about our Climate Crisis. He has been actively involved in the ClimateFast group (https://climatefast.ca) for the past 3 years. He works to bring awareness of our Climate Crisis to others. He has created the myclimatechange.home.blog website, for tracking climate-related news articles, reports, and organizations. He is always looking for opportunities through the work of ClimateFast to reach out to communities, politicians, and governments to communicate about our Climate Crisis. He is married and has 2 daughters and 2 grandchildren. He says: “Our world is in dire straits. Doing nothing is not an option. We must do everything we can to create a liveable future for our children, our grandchildren, and all future generations.”

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